Rebecca Readalong: Week 1

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It’s the end of Rebecca week 1! We have been so thrilled to see all of the comments and Instagram posts throughout the week.

If you haven’t started reading Rebecca, you still have plenty of time. You can view our entire readalong schedule here. Please be aware this post will contain spoilers for the first 8 chapters of Rebecca.

The LOHF team has come up with some discussion questions, and we’d love to hear your thoughts as well!

Discussion

1. The first 5 chapters are not what one might think of as “horror”, but how is Du Maurier setting the stage for possible gothic horror elements in the coming chapters? Is it the language? The characters? Or something else?

Emily: I link gothic horror to crumbling wealth – in particular, a beautiful home gone to ruin. This is exactly what du Maurier describes in the beginning section. Something terrible has happened (I assume), and the narrator is left haunted by the home she once had.

Cat: I think it’s a careful blend of everything, but in particular, the very first chapter that details Manderley’s fate made quite a dark impression; certain, distinct words are used to describe the effects of nature – choked, malevolent, uncontrolled – on what was once considered the protagonist’s epitome of perfection. Perhaps that’s akin to the chaos that will inevitably overtake her life.

Alex: Manderley’s fate and deterioration helps us establish a sense of dark and drab times or even potential foreshadowing. The house as a symbol of life and a status symbol has fallen and so might the status and life of the narrator.

2. How do you feel about the narrator remaining nameless until she becomes (the second) Mrs. de Winters?

Tracy: I think by having the narrator remain nameless until marriage, Du Maurier accomplishes several things. A – it reflects the narrators low sense of self worth and B – adds to the sense that she is “no one” until she’s associated, by marriage, with a man. Possible reflection of the time period as well.

Emily: I think the fact that the narrator remains nameless until attached to someone else says a lot about how she sees herself. Her life is dependent on someone else – she doesn’t view herself as an individual, and finds her identity in other people. The lack of solid identity for other women is present as well – Rebecca receives name recognition, but many of the other women are only known by their husband’s last names. Even the female dog doesn’t have a name; she’s just Jasper’s mother.

*Alex:  I am not a fan of the narrator remaining nameless, but I do think it adds to the story and maybe one of the points that the author is trying to portray.  It seems to me that this woman is a nobody (maybe due to her own sense of self-worth and dependency issues or maybe just due to the time period). She is first of all introduced as a companion, still nameless. And secondly she is Mrs. Maxim de Winter.  She finally has a name but it is still not even her own name as it belongs to her husband. And she now belongs to her husband.

3. Does the narrator’s passiveness make it hard to relate to her or find her empathetic?

Emily: I have mixed feelings on the narrator’s passiveness. It’s clear that she has yet to find her own identity, and I think she will let people continue walking all over her until that happens…UNLESS there’s a more sinister game at play & it’s intentional (I haven’t read the book, so I don’t know). I feel sorry for her right now.

Alex: Her passiveness is irritating me.  I want her to stand up for herself and make some decisions.  It seems that she is so worried about doing anything original or making her own mind with the risk of upsetting someone or causing someone to be mad or inconvenienced.

Cat: Yes and no. I think, for a book such as this, published in 1938, there’s a significant difference in almost everything if compared to modern times. At twenty-one, the protagonist is very much a child; she’s void of the experience, independency and knowledge that’s available and at our very fingertips today. There’s also the matter of social status and how she’s treated by others – if I were to be ignored or otherwise considered inferior every day of my life, my personality would no doubt be molded by it. I try to put myself in that mindset, despite how frustrating it can be at times.

4. What do you think the narrator’s attraction is to Maxim? She compares him several times to a crush on an upper classman, brother, friend, etc. but never once says lover.

Tracy: This attraction might be a couple things. He seems to be the first person that treats her as an individual (even though he hulks out frequently) so she’s flattered by that – he’s so much older and seemingly refined compared to little old her.

Emily: Right now, I assume that the narrator’s attraction to Maxim is wrapped up in societal expectations and longing for a better life. I am uncertain about if the attraction is to him, or just what he can offer. I also think that she probably feels alone, and this is a way to avoid being alone.

Alex: I think the narrator’s not really in love with Maxim.  I think she has these dreams of escaping the life she is in, but she does not know what she wants to escape to as she does not really seem like she has much focused ambition.  It comes across that the narrator just assumes this is her place in life. She is to promote to wife from companion and so on and so on.

5. How do you feel about Daphne du Maurier’s writing?

Emily: The writing is beautiful – it’s a slow burn, but it’s descriptive and intriguing. It’s a bit haunting – I have thought about this book when I’m not reading it. I feel like I need to be dressed like Blair Waldorf and drinking in my non-existent parlour to fully appreciate this book.

Alex: The writing in this book is purposeful and whimsically haunting.  The descriptions are so enticing that, while having a somewhat slower plot, the reader can’t help but to keep reading and keep turning those pages to experience more of the style.  I also find myself wanting to talk to my husband and say things like “pish posh!” and “what does thou want for dinner?” after I finish reading.

Lilyn: I am not a fan. Frankly I would rather be reading an automotive manual. It might be boring as hell too, but at least I might gain some knowledge from it. Du Maurier’s style of writing doesn’t even come close to what I enjoy, and when that is coupled with a positively spineless character, well… Yeah. Beer good, book bad, Lilyn bored.

Quotes

Here are some of our favorite quotes from the first 8 chapters of Rebecca:

There was nothing for it but to sit in my usual place beside Mrs. Van Hopper while she, like a large, complacent spider, spun her wide net of tedium about the stranger’s person.

His premonition of disaster was correct from the beginning; and like a ranting actress in an indifferent play, I might say that we have paid for freedom.

Nature had come into her own again and, little by little, in her stealthy,insidious way had encroached upon the drive with long, tenacious fingers.

The house was a sepulchre, our fear and suffering lay buried in the ruins. There would be no resurrection.

That corner in the drive, too, where the trees encroach upon. . . the gravel, is not a place in which to pause, not after the sun has set. When the leaves rustle, they sound very much like the stealthy movement of a woman in evening dress, and when they shiver suddenly, and fall, and scatter away along the ground, they might be the patter, patter, of a woman’s hurrying footstep, and the mark in the gravel the imprint of a high-heeled satin shoe.

Do you have any favorite quotes from this section? We would love for you to share them!

Giveaway

We are so excited to have you guys reading Rebecca along with us. We would like to host a giveaway as a thank you for joining in.

Prize: We will be giving away one copy of our next readalong selection (to be announced at the end of the Rebecca readalong!) to one randomly selected participant.

How to enter: Comment on our discussion posts throughout the Rebecca readalong to be entered into the giveaway. You will receive one entry each week you join in. In your comment, share your thoughts on the current week’s section of Rebecca, share your favorite quotes, or post a link where we can find your thoughts on the current week’s section.

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35 Comments Add yours

  1. latasha says:

    1. I agree with Cat. She’s already told us something awful happened so now she’s bringing us in and setting everything up.
    2. I’m with Tracy on this one and even said something like that in my review. she is no one until she’s married, she’s unworthy of a name, or so she thinks and could be reflective of the time. get married, have babies, that’s what was expected and that was it.
    3. honey! just speak up! say something. I can’t relate to her cause you can speak up and not be a jerk.
    4. I don’t think there’s any attraction here. he paid attention to her and she mistakes that for love and he’s looking for a distraction.
    5. I like her writing! more than I ever thought I would.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. i’m surprised by how much I like her writing, too! It’s so beautiful.

      Like

    2. Yep I think she’s going to be confused later when it’s not love

      Like

    3. Lilyn G says:

      Yeah #4 is so true.

      Like

    4. I think his attraction in her is that she is nothing like Rebecca. I feel he wanted more a companion than a woman who may try to truly replace the first wife. The narrator’s passive and boring nature was really what he wanted. I also don’t believe he wants to forget the memory of his first wife.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Jude says:

    The writing in this book is beautifully descriptive but it is a slow burner. I’m hoping the next few chapters pick up, and hook me in. I am intrigued to find out how things work out with maxim who I have not taking a liking to so far lol!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m really loving her writing. I’m anxious to see what’s going to happen. I hope it picks up, but I’m loving the foreshadowing, too.

      Like

  3. Kimberly says:

    1. I felt that the beginning chapter set the scene for the gothic “feel” immediately. Besides giving us the knowledge that something “horrible” has happened at Manderly to cause them to leave and live in “lower class” accommodations, it sets the tone and lets us know that the narrator was no longer the same person she was in the beginning. For example, she refers to Maxim as having to “depend on her now”, which makes me wonder what happened to him. Having never read this before, I’m conjuring up all kinds of mishaps in my mind–the most prominent being something taking away his vision, since she has mentioned “reading aloud”. For those that have already read this, please don’t enlighten me yet! LOL!!

    2. This was one of the questions I wanted to ask the group, not being sure if I missed something…. The woman is NEVER named, except as Mrs. de Winter. I feel that this is quite deliberate on du Maurier’s part to show that she does not “exist” as a seperate personality yet. She is merely so and so’s companion, Maxim’s wife, etc. She is not an individual, but rather an extension of someone much more important than she. Even Mrs. Danvers has a name! While it vexes me to read that, I think that it is necessary in portraying her as what she herself feels herself to be at this time–non-essential, a tag-along of someone of higher status. Even when married, she feels her inferiority in upbringing, despite her elevated status by marriage.

    3. Her passiveness, while upsetting to those of us in today’s society, would be much more understandable when taken in context with the time the novel was published. Women in general had lesser “status” in the eyes of many. In the beginning, (again, thinking of the time period) I felt this was natural and the way she truly WOULD behave/see herself. However, after the first day at Manderley, enduring Mrs. Danver’s less than subtle slights, it does irritate me that she doesn’t take advantage of her newfound status and snap back: “That may be, Mrs. Danvers, but Rebecca is dead and I am now in charge of these matters. Being new to this, I expect you to help me in any way necessary until I’ve had the chance to adjust to my new role.” Hopefully, she will come to this in the future!!! LOL!

    4.Her attraction to Maxim. I believe it starts much the same as a regular person seeing a movie star in person–someone more “public” and idolized by many. A fantasy come true. As he begins to spend time with her, I honestly believe she “loves” him, in much the same way a teenager will “love” their first crush. Judging by her position in society, I’m thinking that she never had the attentions of a man before, and when Maxim pays this to her, it is compounded because of his importance, compared to hers, in their society. Yes, she loves him, because I don’t believe she’s ever had the chance to “love” any man before.

    5. The language is hauntingly beautiful, in my humble opinion. But then, I grew up with my first reads being Lovecraft, Benson, M.R. James, and Poe (my mother’s collections), so I find the return of this more “elegant” language refreshing. And of course, the time period that the novel is set in has much to do with it. If the language were more modern, it would detract from the reality of the story, as a whole.

    **When I read a physical book, I have a tendency to take notes on quotes that I like, in order to inject some into my reviews, to give others an idea of what the language/tone of the book is like. Many of the quotes you mentioned are ones I also wrote down! A couple of others I added for the feelings they invoked were:
    “. . . boredom is a pleasing antidote to fear . . . ”
    And this one which irritated me to no end, yet set the tone for the next part of the novel:
    “. . . I’m asking you to marry me, you little fool.”
    (Showing how demeaning Maxim can be to her. THAT’S his proposal, and she accepts. Of course, she’s star-struck with his attention, and despises her position with Mrs. Van Hopper). Still, it emphasizes the difference in how he thinks of her, and how she thinks of him.

    😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So many good thoughts! This is my first time reading it, and I really think Maxim is going to end up having some sort of head injury.

      Like

      1. Kimberly says:

        I’m thinking along the lines of a head injury, or eye injury (maybe something to symbolize him being “blind” to his new wife early on, and how he later has to depend upon her. . . .

        Like

    2. Great thoughts, Kimberly.

      I want to know what has happened to Maxim and Manderley, but I’m hoping not to be spoiled! 🙂

      I agree the narrator’s lack of a name feels very deliberate. The topic of her name is even brought up a couple of times.

      I’m not nearly as irritated by the narrator as everyone else seems to be. I think she’s a product of her time (and I can even relate to her youthful naivety). When she’s speaking in the present, she seems much more in control so we shall see!

      Like

    3. Lilyn G says:

      I wasn’t a fan of the language, but you are right. It does fit it. A more modern language wouldn’t feel right.

      Like

    4. Laurie | Bark says:

      I did read this once before but I can’t remember what happened to Maxim but I sure hope it’s dreadful considering how he’s treating the narrator.! I feel so terribly sorry for her.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Michelle says:

    So far, the only quote I’ve taken down is when Max says “All memories are bitter, and I prefer to ignore them.” I think this sums up everything so far, whatever happened to Rebecca, what’s happened so far with the second Mrs. deWinter…its like everyone has experienced so many situations in which they end up preferring to ignore rather than learn from it.

    As far as our narrator, she definitely needs others to have a sense of who she is, and again, despite previous situations in which she’s been made to feel badly (especially with Mrs. Van Hopper), she ignores this memory when it happens again (with Mrs. Danvers). I find myself very irritated with our narrator, but like Cat, I try to think of the time period. Like Lilyn, I find myself getting a bit bored with the writing style. Although the storyline does grab my attention once I start reading, I feel it’s mostly with the hopes that something will happen soon and maybe now our narrator will stand up for herself. Her passivity bothers me mostly because I’m reminded of myself at a younger age, and it’s frustrating, especially since in this time period, this was “how it was.” I empathize with our narrator, but find myself wanting to shake her and annoyed by her at the same time.

    I think keeping our narrator nameless so far continues to reinforce her being walked on by everyone, which I think actually gives a bit more of a haunting/horror feel. A nameless character is usually “unimportant,” yet this is our narrator, so she must be important. She is a “nobody,” yet she is somebody enough to get all this attention (albeit mostly negative from Danvers and Van Hopper).

    I’m very much looking forward to finding out what will happen. The writing style may not be to my liking, but I do find myself feeling like I need to keep reading to know what comes next.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Lilyn G says:

      That is a good quote from Max. Unlike you, I have no desire to keep reading. But I have to! LOL

      Like

      1. Michelle says:

        I’m much too curious at this point, especially after meeting Mrs. Danvers. I’m hoping her weird and rude behavior will prod the narrator to action or do SOMETHING.

        Like

      2. Lilyn G says:

        I’m doing my reading doe next week and am at least a little more interested.

        Like

      3. Yes you do Lilyn!!! No automotive manuals for you!!

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Good quote! I think the no-name thing gives so much insight into the character.

      Like

      1. Michelle says:

        Yes, definitely! I’m very curious to find out if we ever find out her name. I’ve never read this, so I don’t know if we do or not, but it’s one of the main things holding my attention at the moment. She doesn’t even call herself by any name besides Mrs. Van Hopper’s companion and then Mrs. de Winter! It’s crazy to me.

        Like

  5. Anne says:

    In response to #1, I think the first chapter does so much to set the gothic tone as the woods take back a crumbling, abandoned version of Manderley, though I do kind of think it’s on the verge of tipping over into comical melodrama (spoken like Steve Martin in The Jerk – “that woman hates plants!”). And ol’ Skully McSkullface Mrs. Danvers is one of my favorite literary villains. She’s so relentlessly weird and obviously evil, to Maleficent-level proportions (original Maleficent, not retconned version). Her appearance does a lot to bolster the haunted house flavor of the story, even though nothing overtly supernatural has happened.

    There’s also something really claustrophobic (and thus gothicky) about the jaw-droppingly blatant power games going on between Danvers and the narrator, which go completely over Maxim’s head (or, more accurately probably, beneath his notice). His gender and class privilege make him completely blind to Mrs. Danvers’ vicious reception, and the fact that he can’t see what’s happening means that the narrator is completely on her own in terms of dealing with it.

    I wrote a little more about the narrator than would gracefully fit in a comment on my blog too, if anyone’s interested! http://www.annegresham.com/defense-second-mrs-maxim-de-winter/

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Lilyn G says:

      I agree with you on being right on the verge of comical melodrama. And yeah, definitely beneath Max’s notice, though I don’t see how. He must be really self-obsessed.

      Like

  6. MiracleNest says:

    1. I really like the foreshadowing in the novel. I like the obvious parts and the more subtle parts to it. Obviously something so bad happened that they had to leave Manderley, a mansion that had belonged to Maxim’s family for generations.
    2. I really like the intentional non-naming of the narrator. I think it just creates a bigger presence of Rebecca.
    3. I agree with Cat. She’s young and naive and she evens refers to herself that way as she’s recalling the events. I can totally empathize with her, but I hope she starts sticking up for herself.
    4. I agree with Tracy on this one. She’s not used to people paying her any mind, and here is this older, seemingly handsome and person of great importance making her feel like a somebody. She’s totally crushin’ lol.
    5. LOVE the writing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree with you completely. I love the writing so much and the foreshadowing as well. I’m able to empathize with the narrator, too. I think she will get stronger as the novel progresses. I hope!

      Liked by 3 people

  7. Kimberly says:

    I love this “group chat”! It’s opened up so many other possibilities that I hadn’t thought of. Although I must admit, I’m glad it’s my first time reading it so that I can let my imagination run free with speculation at this point. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Laurie | Bark says:

      Yeah, I wish I were reading it for the first time. I know all the answers and I so badly want to blurt them out! But I won’t 🙂

      Like

  8. Mia says:

    1) Du Maurier is setting the stage by describing a home gone to ruins and also keeps making references to this mysterious Rebecca.
    2) It’s driving me crazy! I really want to know her name beyond Mrs. de Winters.
    3) I think her passiveness makes her empathetic. It’s hard to go from a world of having barely anything to suddenly having the world at your feet. So I think it’s appropriate for her to act that way. I have a feeling she will change and get a handle on her new world.
    4) If I remember right the narrator’s parents are deceased so I think she is looking for a sense of stability. The fact that he is older and sees her for her and not as a servant could also be a reason for her attraction to him.
    5) I love Daphne du Maurier writing. It’s very descriptive but not overly so and it is easy to follow.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Kimberly says:

      NOOOOO! LOL!!! I need to see which of my theories (if any) are correct!! 😉

      Like

  9. Cristina Martinez says:

    du Maurier sets the stage for gothic fiction from the first chapter. In Chapter 1, du Maurier begins with the narrator telling the reader about the dream she had about her previous home, Manderley. The details of this first chapter are crucial for readers to understand that the fear/terror in the story is tethered to this house. Like a lot of gothic fiction (for example, The Haunting of Hill House), the supernatural (i.e. ghosts) and other elements of fear are anchored to a house that is equally beautiful and haunting. In this first chapter, the house in her dream describes Manderley as “forlorn” and the details of the house are of decay. The house is not fragrant nor benevolent. It is abandoned and overtaken by nature. Rather than the rich descriptions of overgrown, fragrant garden (of daffodils, colorful crocuses, primrose, violet, and bluebells), the garden in the narrator’s dream is dessicate with “malevolent ivy” and “nettle”. The mansion is in decay and a “sepulchre” to what we may assume is either someone’s ghost or a bad memory (or both).

    2. The narrator is nameless until she is officially the second Mrs. de Winters. I see this detail fulfilling two roles: First, this detail reflects the reality of this time where women’s identities are tied to their husbands or male kin. Secondly, this detail also serves as a foreshadowing element that this narrator will likely remain invisible even after her marriage (she will continue in the shadows of the first Mrs. de Winter).

    3. The narrator’s passivity is interesting to me, and I can sincerely understand why it is upsetting and annoying to other readers. I think her passivity is her strength in that it is absolutely necessary that the narrator be passive in order to mold into her situation and survive. Up to chapter 8, we don’t know what exactly the narrator is up again, but we know that she will be filling the shoes of a looming figure, the first Mrs. de Winter. The first de Winter is described as beautiful and very loved by Mr. de Winter until her eventual death. This reality is established very early in the novel, making readers aware that there is really “no way” that this clumsy and inexperienced girl could ever meet up to the first Mrs. de Winter. In my early opinion, I think the narrator is not passive; she is a survivor who does what she needs to do to survive. In this case, passivity is her tool. She can’t be too passive is she’s the only voice we get the story from. In fact, she has enough power to survive whatever situation awaits her at Manderlay. While she is not the heroine we may be used to via modern Western lens, we should think about what power her passivity may hold.

    4. I think that the narrator’s attraction to Maxim is purely paternal. She may feel “love” but he is also fulfilling a father figure role that is absent in her life.

    5. du Maurier’s writing is slow and tedious, and at any other moment I may hate it. However, her elaborate prose, slow-burning details in the settings she describes are what build the pace and the rhythm for the novel. In my reading, it is building suspense and emphasizing the thin line between beauty and horror that I’m personally always looking for in gothic fiction. If one reads carefully, there are a lot of descriptions that are contrasting (the beautiful vs the ugly); details that foreshadow [“That corner in the drive, too…is not a place in which to pause, nor after the sun has set. When the leaves rustle, they sound very much like the stealthy movement of a woman in an evening dress…and the mark in the gravel the imprint of a high-heeled satin shoe…” (9)]; and symbolic transformations (“the rest of the tangerine is sour, I shouldn’t eat it” a perfect fruit turns sour during Maxim’s proposal to the narrator; and the house in the dream taking the monstrous and ugly form that it represents.

    Well, that’s it for now – those are some thoughts based on my notes. Excited to continue!

    Like

  10. du Maurier sets the stage for gothic fiction from the first chapter. In Chapter 1, du Maurier begins with the narrator telling the reader about the dream she had about her previous home, Manderley. The details of this first chapter are crucial for readers to understand that the fear/terror in the story is tethered to this house. Like a lot of gothic fiction (for example, The Haunting of Hill House), the supernatural (i.e. ghosts) and other elements of fear are anchored to a house that is equally beautiful and haunting. In this first chapter, the house in her dream describes Manderley as “forlorn” and the details of the house are of decay. The house is not fragrant nor benevolent. It is abandoned and overtaken by nature. Rather than the rich descriptions of overgrown, fragrant garden (of daffodils, colorful crocuses, primrose, violet, and bluebells), the garden in the narrator’s dream is dessicate with “malevolent ivy” and “nettle”. The mansion is in decay and a “sepulchre” to what we may assume is either someone’s ghost or a bad memory (or both).

    2. The narrator is nameless until she is officially the second Mrs. de Winters. I see this detail fulfilling two roles: First, this detail reflects the reality of this time where women’s identities are tied to their husbands or male kin. Secondly, this detail also serves as a foreshadowing element that this narrator will likely remain invisible even after her marriage (she will continue in the shadows of the first Mrs. de Winter).

    3. The narrator’s passivity is interesting to me, and I can sincerely understand why it is upsetting and annoying to other readers. I think her passivity is her strength in that it is absolutely necessary that the narrator be passive in order to mold into her situation and survive. Up to chapter 8, we don’t know what exactly the narrator is up again, but we know that she will be filling the shoes of a looming figure, the first Mrs. de Winter. The first de Winter is described as beautiful and very loved by Mr. de Winter until her eventual death. This reality is established very early in the novel, making readers aware that there is really “no way” that this clumsy and inexperienced girl could ever meet up to the first Mrs. de Winter. In my early opinion, I think the narrator is not passive; she is a survivor who does what she needs to do to survive. In this case, passivity is her tool. She can’t be too passive is she’s the only voice we get the story from. In fact, she has enough power to survive whatever situation awaits her at Manderlay. While she is not the heroine we may be used to via modern Western lens, we should think about what power her passivity may hold.

    4. I think that the narrator’s attraction to Maxim is purely paternal. She may feel “love” but he is also fulfilling a father figure role that is absent in her life.

    5. du Maurier’s writing is slow and tedious, and at any other moment I may hate it. However, her elaborate prose, slow-burning details in the settings she describes are what build the pace and the rhythm for the novel. In my reading, it is building suspense and emphasizing the thin line between beauty and horror that I’m personally always looking for in gothic fiction. If one reads carefully, there are a lot of descriptions that are contrasting (the beautiful vs the ugly); details that foreshadow [“That corner in the drive, too…is not a place in which to pause, nor after the sun has set. When the leaves rustle, they sound very much like the stealthy movement of a woman in an evening dress…and the mark in the gravel the imprint of a high-heeled satin shoe…” (9)]; and symbolic transformations (“the rest of the tangerine is sour, I shouldn’t eat it” a perfect fruit turns sour during Maxim’s proposal to the narrator; and the house in the dream taking the monstrous and ugly form that it represents.

    Well, that’s it for now – those are some thoughts based on my notes. Excited to continue!1.

    Liked by 1 person

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